Author Topic: uses of "me" and "I"  (Read 17099 times)

Joe Carillo

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Re: uses of "me" and "I"
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2010, 12:22:56 PM »
I don't think so. "Cavalierly" is descriptive of a state of mind or attitude that's "marked by or given to offhand and often disdainful dismissal of important matters." Saying something "loosely" is a mark of carelessness rather than of being cavalierly. The adjective "nonchalant," which means "having an air of easy unconcern or indifference," is a close synonym of "cavalierly."

vans26

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Re: uses of "me" and "I"
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2010, 07:48:11 PM »
Sir Joe,   Me, I don't know who was right about cavalierly and cavalier.   Are you asking your expert friends?

Joe Carillo

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Re: uses of "me" and "I"
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2010, 08:22:45 PM »
I don’t think there’s any need to bother the experts about the usage of “cavalierly” and “cavalier.” The semantic distinction between the two is actually very elementary and it has been clarified in the Forum beyond any doubt. Please just go over the previous discussion thread on the usage of these two words. You’ll see that we have already beaten the horse dead on this subject, so to speak, so there’s really no need to bring the animal back to life for renewed flogging. Enough is enough.

aurorariel

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Re: uses of "me" and "I"
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2010, 12:23:23 PM »
Sorry for late posting.  I have 3 points to make.

1) Lyricists with poetic license have written songs saying, "For you and I."  For sure, this adds to the confusion on uses of "me" and "I." 

It's easy to forget that for either nominative or objective case, the second person "you" is fine.  Yet for first person, nominative case is "I" and objective case is "me." 

2) It seems that while we traditionally use the first person in deference to others, present speakers no longer observe such courtesy.  Instead of saying "My friends and I" they do not mind saying, "I and my friends" and maybe to avoid using "I" at the beginning of a sentence, they say,  "Me and my friends."

3) It seems that the discussion on cavalierly vs. cavalier has become a bit lively and more.

I prefer your use of adverb over an adjective.  Between a person and an act, I'd rather criticize an act.  As Catholics should learn, we should hate sin but we pray for the sinner.

I want to thank you for reminders to join the forum.  I try to login as often as I can.  I enjoy your lessons and critiques and the enlightening contributions of forum participants.

Bunty

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Re: uses of "me" and "I"
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2011, 01:58:45 PM »
Mistakes made with these two English pronouns have been increasing exponentially for years. The difference is actually very simple - let me explain it to you.
 

I:

I is the first person singular subject pronoun, which means that it refers to the person performing the action of a verb.

I want to go.

This is the one I like.

You and I need to get ready.

Tom and I are going to the movies.


Me:

Me is an object pronoun, which means that it refers to the person that the action of a verb is being done to, or to which a preposition refers.

David told me to leave.

He gave me ten dollars.

Between you and me, this is a bad idea.

She needs to talk to Joe or me.
Bunty