Author Topic: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan  (Read 14004 times)

madgirl09

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The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« on: January 26, 2010, 07:23:17 AM »
Hello Friends. I am writing an article or Letter to the Editor to be sent soon to our leading English newspaper here in Japan. Have you heard about the JPEPA workers finally coming to Japan? The issue was debated extensively in the past 2 years in the Philippines, until the group finally arrived in Japan in May, 2009. Now that they are here facing numerous problems, they are helpless and frustrated. There are so many issues to be tackled in the body including unfair labor policies, non-professionalism, insufficient language study, salary below poverty line, absence of a labor attache to represent them, etc. I need the expertise of some of you here, especially on the art of reasoning and social issues (renz and maxims... ;D) and suggest ways to simplify, make it formal and worth reading (Sir Joe, please). I wish others share their thoughts and expert advice too, especially on the labor issues. I have sent my draft to my email group with international readership, and some suggested that I send it to various papers worldwide to gain sympathy too. For now, I can't post the letter here, but would surely do once it's finally posted in our daily paper here. I'm afraid too, that the great amount of emotion in it would make my letter very informal....so please, suggest expressions to use. I can send privately a copy to anyone who can help improve it.  Thank you, thank you! Doumo!  :-*

renzphotography

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2010, 07:45:22 AM »

Hi Madgirl,

If you want the letter to be published then keep it below 300 words (I don't know how that works for the Japanese language). Otherwise, don't go more than 4 pages.

To be published as a letter-to-the-editor keep the tone of the letter subdued. Try the pyramid-style of composition (used for hard news writing). Start the composition with a short but powerful statement that captures the essence of the composition. Then, develop the body where you work with the detailed and stronger points first and gradually move to more general statements.

Lastly, round up the composition with your conclusion.

You can do it  :D


As for a more detailed treatment, you may want to discuss the details with us when you are ready.

When you have plenty of ideas spinning in your head, the best way to catch them is to write a list of these ideas. Initially, keep it one idea per sentence (gist only). When you think you are done review the sentences and see how you can group them together, and perhaps come up with a sub-title per group.

You may then write the story one paragraph at a time.

 

maxsims

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2010, 12:20:12 PM »
Dear Madgirl,

Is JPEPA a Filipino-Japanese arrangement whereby your nurses are permitted to work in Japan?  If so, those problems you mention (salaries, representation, language) should have been anticipated.   The question now is not how to write an effectual letter to the editor but whether such a letter will do any good.

Lest you think I'm being unduly pessimistic, there is a solution:  send your nurses to Australia!   The pay is better, the conditions are better, the language is easier and the people are welcoming.

madgirl09

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2010, 08:04:56 AM »
Many of the nurses are going home soon. They are really thinking of going to Australia, UK, or Canada instead while USA still observes a retrogression in some work visas. Which agency do you think could help them process their application? Thinking of establishing an employment agency soon?  ;D The nurses pay a lot to get to good countries  ;). Thanks, Max.

maxsims

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2010, 05:58:03 PM »
Madgirl, I'm not acquainted with any of the migration agencies in your countries, but I have it on good authority that one has to be very careful in selecting one.   Certainly, they seem to charge an arm and a leg for their services.

A young lady of my acquaintance migrated three years ago to Australia on a fiancee visa.  She and her fiance, who are both competent on a computer, did most of the paperwork themselves.

Another young lady of my acquaintance is preparing to apply for a visa to Australia, where she wishes to work as a nurse.    Her first action was to ask the relevant State Nursing Board for its requirements; no point trying emigrate if your qualifications are unsufficient.  And your English proficiency.   Her second action was to check the Australian Department of Immigration's website.

maxsims

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2010, 03:12:50 PM »
Whoops!    Insufficient.    :-[

madgirl09

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2010, 02:37:30 PM »
Thanks for that info. Max. Let's go to Australia! I've been to just Cairns and Brisbane. How's life in other parts of Australia?

How's everyone? Busy watching Vancouver Winter Olympic games? Visit Vancouver now, the world's most livable city, according to Economics Magazine (?). Four Australian cities also ranked in the top ten of the best cities in the world. Max, for you, what's the best Australian city?

Good that the English skills requirements to work and live in Australia has been lowered to level 6 average (in all skills). I think, Queensland has become one of the targets of the nurses;NZ cities too.

-----

Big thanks to Sir Joe and Renz for helping me with my letter-to-editor draft  ;) . The long article was too long to be put at LTE page, but the three different versions were sent to many agencies and organizations in charge of evaluating the matter. I've seen a few developments, especially on hospital administrative levels discussions. I am waiting for other publications to post some parts of the article before I sent other copies to one concerned Ministry.

Luckily, the summary version made it to the Japan Times Opinion page under letters-to-editor. But the editor changed the title putting "caregiver" instead of "healthworkers" (grrr), and adding a couple of words and punctuations. The nurses were not so satisfied with this capsulized letter as lots of the details are missing, but I think the important gist is there. I was worried they'd ignore the whole message altgether, so I made it that short. I hope other magazines contacted by my foreign friends here post any of the longer versions as a feature article soon. See this short letter at Japan Times:

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/rc20100211a5.html

Because of this advocacy, I am now invited by an association of educators to give a presentation in March next year on the new education and new language learning of our nurses and caregivers. Thanks to all who shared support. :D

madgirl


maxsims

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2010, 07:10:51 PM »
Madgirl,   Melbourne is my favourite city, which is why I live there.   It's not perfect, mind you, and the changeable climate is not to everyone's liking, but it suits me just fine.

It's interesting that Melbourne ranks just below Vancouver in the "livable city" ratings.   If you visit both cities, you'll see that they are physically alike.   The characteristics of the people are similar, too, but the Canadians have no sport that can rival Australian Rules Fooball!

Brisbane, the capital of Queensland is a pleasant, not-too-large city which appeals to Filipinos because of its warmer climate.   And it's not too far from our celebrated Gold Coast.

I've not been to New Zealand and its spectacular scenery, but everyone I know who has visited the place speaks highly of it.  It would be a bit on the cold side for me but the Kiwis are warm-hearted people.    They even speak English - sort of!

Sydney is our largest city - for the moment - and it's a beautiful place, if somewhat difficult to navigate.   I can't speak first-hand for Perth, never having been there.   It's somewhat isolated from the mainstream but the people are amenable and the climate is great.

madgirl09

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2010, 07:43:01 AM »
Hello! How are you, friends at Sir Joe's Forum?
If you are not so busy and would want some socio-civic "involvement", join this discussion (on the topic above) posted at this Japan-based blog-Debito.org. The owner, Debito Aroudou (his pen name) is one of the well-known human rights foreign journalists in Japan. He keeps a weekly column at Japan Times. Yesterday, he posted the comments/article/reactions we wrote on current conditions of the JPEPA health workers at his blog. I am just so busy this week to continue giving answers and supporting details to their queries (hosting a seminar again this weekend  :'()...but if anyone has something to say in defense of the nurses and the writer  ;D , and wish to advocate on the protection of our people from exploitation abroad, please share your valued ideas. I think I'd need the whole week to organize one good answer to some questions...but I also have work to do...(sigh).

There's one seemingly unsupportive poster there implying that "nurses stop complaining and comparing". The article does not talk much about discrimination thing, actually, but criticizes the poor design of the program. It seeks to rouse attention of the planners to remedy the ailing condition of the JPEPA workers. I have a feeling that such person represents an entity which has some connection to the JPEPA program...but I could be wrong. Anyway,....enjoy reading. See the article with comments from some readers here:

http://www.debito.org/?p=6056

madgirl/Emily

nonoynet

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2011, 04:35:17 PM »
So you mean to say this deployment of JPEPA nurses is not reliable?

Joe Carillo

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2011, 07:08:37 AM »
Madgirl09 e-mailed the reply below last night to the comment of nonoynet to her March 3, 2010 posting. She says she couldn't post it herself because she has lost and forgotten her password:

A lot has changed since I first posted this article. Thanks to the two articles my friends helped me construct, the ever helpful editor friends, as well to the various groups that supported the cause of the JPEPA nurses, joining hands with Indonesian Health organizations openly criticizing the program. One of the positive results of our drum-beating on the poor design and loopholes of the JPEPA system is a modification of the structure of the test where English will be added to define many Kanji terms in the exam as promised by the Exams committee. The nurses are also now provided study and review supports, meeting dates, and reviewers of various types are made to constantly provide exercises. Although a lot still has to be improved in salaries, benefits and housing for the nurses, it is evident that the authorities concerned are now carefully assessing the conditions of the health workers connected to the program. I will be meeting some nurses in February, 2011 before or after they take their second take of the exam (middle of Feb) to gather more feedback and updates. Thank you all for your concern in uplifting the working condition of our fellow Filipinos wherever they are.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2011, 07:11:00 AM by Joe Carillo »

basitali

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2011, 12:38:37 AM »
You are so right
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ginegine

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Re: The Plight of the JPEPA Nurses and Caregivers in Japan
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2011, 03:07:41 PM »
So you mean to say this deployment of JPEPA nurses is not reliable?