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Author Topic: Team up with me in My Media English Watch!  (Read 4649 times)
Joe Carillo
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« on: September 23, 2009, 12:21:19 AM »

Starting today, September 23, I am inviting Forum members to team up with me in doing My Media English Watch. This way, we can further widen this Forumā€™s dragnet for bad or questionable English usage in both the print media and broadcast media, thus giving more teeth to our campaign to encourage them to continuously improve their English. All you need to do is pinpoint every serious English misuse you encounter while reading your favorite newspaper or viewing your favorite network or cable TV programs. Just tell me about the English misuse and I will do a grammar critique of it.

Please keep in mind, though, that itā€™s not our intention in this media English watch to humiliate media people or to put a particular media outlet to shame for its bad English. We only want to extirpate the sin, not to flagellate the sinner. By being circumspect and non-adversarial in our media English watch, we stand a greater chance of motivating print and broadcast journalists to be more watchful of their grammar, vocabulary, and syntax in the context of their being role models for good English.

Let's therefore strictly observe the following guidelines and house rules:

1.   Our media English watch will cover only domestic print and broadcast media outlets in the Philippines. Post in this section only the portion of the media story or statement with a serious or notable wrong English usage; ignore simple typographical and spelling errors unless their presence results in serious problems in semantics or logic.
 
2.   Make sure that the by-line and the name of the media outlet are not shown in your direct posting on this section. The Forum moderator will immediately delete any posting that doesnā€™t follow this guideline.

3.   If the faulty English usage is originally in digital form, post your report about it on this section together with a link to the website where it comes from. If you know how, embed that link in the title of your posting; otherwise, just indicate that link at the bottom of your report and the Forum moderator will do the embedding.
   
4.   If the material with the faulty English usage is in printed form or in spoken form, donā€™t post it directly on this section; instead, send us e-mail about it to jcarilloforum@gmail.com and we will make the posting for you. Just quote the statement verbatim in your e-mail and indicate the type of media outlet (newspaper, magazine, TV, radio), the section or program where it appeared or was broadcast, and the date of publication. Please understand that we will need to verify material of this kind, so please also indicate in your e-mail the publication title, date, and page where the material with the faulty English usage appeared. This information will be used for verification only and will not appear in the posting that we will make for you.

As when we started this media English-usage watch, our objective remains the sameā€”to encourage the national newspapers and TV networks to be much more precise and vigilant with their English, whether in writing or editing their stories or when enunciating them during broadcasts. Of course, we also hope that through this media English watch, not only the media organizations concerned but you and our fellow Forum members could also relearn an overlooked or forgotten lesson or two in English grammar and usageā€”and, every now and then, perhaps in Logic 101 as well.

Letā€™s now get on with our joint media English watch!
« Last Edit: September 23, 2009, 01:16:11 AM by Joe Carillo » Logged

angela
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2009, 01:53:21 PM »

Hello, Mr. Carillo.  This is a great effort to help improve the English of print and broadcast media.   For my part, I find the spoken English in TV news the more shameful, and I've been wanting to tape and transcribe  evening newscasts and point out errors, mostly in the use of prepositions, and also idiomatic expressions.  I also have no problem re citing sources, naming names, because otherwise, will the media people pay attention?  i think not, as they're always too busy meeting daily deadlines.

 
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Joe Carillo
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2009, 09:45:11 PM »

Sorry for this delayed response to your posting, Angela. I have been sidetracked by the recurrent power outages in my part of Metro Manila for a couple of days. Anyway, it would be great if you could post in the Forum your transcriptions of problematic English usage in evening newscasts. You may cite the names of the grammar violators if you feel like doing so; we just need to avoid using insulting or vituperative language when referring to them. Remember: they are patients needing grammar therapy, so we have to be gentle with them.
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hill roberts
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« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2009, 01:27:11 AM »

"Live in the Philippines" site,Monday, 12th October 2009

The incorrect use of "affect" ....

"When the dollar loses strength, the affect is immediate. It doesn't take time for the affect to reach you..."Bob Martin, columnist and owner of the site. Grin Roll Eyes One must go to this site and read his wife's articles, which are always littered with grammatical errors, as well as the lack of knowledge of the use of punctuation marks...LIP's readership is worldwide, from the Philippines, to Europe, the USA and Australia.
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Joe Carillo
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« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2009, 09:20:29 AM »

"Effect" instead of "affect" should have been used, of course, but it's probably only a typographical error. I commit such errors myself every now and then. But if, as you say, Bob Martin's "Live in the Philippines" website is indeed littered with grammatical errors, then he probably needs a good copyeditor and proofreader, or both. Some of the good communicators I know--full of bright ideas and so brilliant in articulating them--have problems with their syntax and spelling, and they recognize the compelling need for a copyeditor to polish their prose. Bob Martin probably should engage the services of one.
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