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1  Joe Carillo's Desk / Getting to Know English / Re: Using the causative and factitive verbs on: August 04, 2017, 08:21:51 AM
I understood that the causative verbs “have,” “make,” and “let”, as you pointed out, should be followed by the base form.

What about these sentences?

1. " “I had my fellow investors signed the incorporation papers yesterday.”

2. “They made him finished writing the book in only five weeks.”

3. “We let the students picked the class schedules they want.”

Thank you, Sir.

2  Saying Your Piece / "My Thoughts Exactly" / Machiavelli's Pal on: December 06, 2016, 08:22:27 AM
What is so frightening about power?

When megalomaniacs use it, it is like they are perpetually drowning themselves into the very core of hell.
No, that hell has no fire. No deafening anguish echoes. Nothing is there. Complete emptiness. It exists but does not live. That is hell.

That same power that they enjoy will infest every DNA that runs in their blood. What these greedy people get, they will repay quadruply.

That power brings ecstasy, but no fabric of their being can escape its wrath, and that worldly joy that they felt will be replaced instantaneously with indescribable torments.
That power is not a venom. Neither it is a hemlock.
It is death in itself if used avariciously.

Not even the most accurate words can even describe how horrendous every nucleus of power has if it falls into the hands of wrong people.

Power is death if the heir is a megalomaniac.

What is so gruesome about power? Everything.
3  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / “Deployment” is lingua franca for the sending of OFWs abroad on: December 23, 2015, 09:36:34 AM
Sir,
 What is the correct preposition to use after deployment?
 Also, is it appropriate to say: "This agency has several deployment to Japan."?
 Deployment sounds a certain military operation is going on. I find it not appropriate to refer to OFWs bound for a   certain country. I stand corrected though.
 Thank you.
4  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / Re: Subject Verb Agreement on: September 16, 2015, 11:22:20 AM
Sir,
 What does notionally mean in your explanation," The subject here is clearly the noun phrase “falling oil prices,” which is plural both grammatically and notionally."?
5  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / The correct form of the future perfect progressive tense on: September 14, 2015, 10:30:55 AM
Sir,
 Please help me identify the correct name of the tense used in this sentence:
 "Just think, this time next month I have been working here for ten years."
 Is it present perfect progressive or future perfect progressive?
 When are we supposed to use future perfect progressive?
 Thank you.
6  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / Re: Test directions on: August 04, 2015, 08:29:35 AM
Good day. Thank you, Sir. It is part of my Communication Skills midterm examination. Should it be test direction or test directions?
7  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / Test directions on: August 03, 2015, 02:20:10 PM
Sir,
 Good day. Please help. Which one should be used:
1. In every set of words, one will be mispronounced. Write the word that is mispronounced, or
2. One in four words for each item will be mispronounced. Write the word that is mispronounced.
    comfortable      sour      debut         ceremony   

 Thank you very much.

8  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / Internet on: July 06, 2015, 10:08:38 AM
Sir,
 Good day. I just noticed that Internet is capitalized regardless of its position in the sentence. Do we have to capitalize it? Thank you.
9  English Grammar and Usage Problems / Use and Misuse / Re: It is unbecoming for priests to claim infallibility in their English grammar on: June 24, 2015, 11:29:55 AM
Sir,
 Some people can't really stand being corrected. I met some professors who had this misunderstanding because of  a certain grammatical usage. I have a colleague, too, who told me that there were two doctorate degree holders who had this accusations and shouting because both did not want to be corrected. I always tell my students that we should humble ourselves when someone corrects us with pure intention. We have to listen, learn from it, and, if still doubtful, do some research to enlighten ourselves and ask experts.
 However, I am just concerned about this post "It is unbecoming for priest to claim infallibility in their English grammar". What if the priest was not informed directly? I believe it is unfair for that priest to be labeled unbecoming, and worse awful. Those descriptions are quite derogatory. Yes, you are right that when it comes to grammar it is about doing and applying the correction given. What if the correction is not given to him?
  I know Jose Oliveros just want to set things right. I know this forum is for us to learn and unlearn about English.   
10  English Grammar and Usage Problems / Use and Misuse / Re: It is unbecoming for priests to claim infallibility in their English grammar on: June 17, 2015, 10:30:23 AM
I am sure that if that priest will be informed directly about these grammatical mistakes, he can see the wisdom about those rules. I tried it once when I explained to our parish priest the difference between on behalf and in behalf. I am not just sure if he applied those differences in his next homily. Pure intention is, I think, what matters most.
11  English Grammar and Usage Problems / Badly Written, Badly Spoken / Re: How to deal with redundancy, illogic and contradiction, and bad syntax on: June 15, 2015, 02:34:27 PM
Answer the essay question briefly and substantially. Is it correct? Thank you.
12  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / Re: Is “in line with this” an ineffectual phrase? on: June 09, 2015, 08:20:33 AM
Sir,
 What about in this example: "Our school will hold its annual research colloquium. In line with this, we invite your graduate students to submit their abstracts." Thank you very much.
13  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / Intonation contours on: August 16, 2014, 09:33:57 PM
Sir,
 Please share us about these intonation contours or patterns. I have been looking for some references already, and yet I found them sometimes confusing. Thank you.
14  Joe Carillo's Desk / Getting to Know English / Re: Lesson #8 – Specific Rules for Preposition Usage on: August 16, 2014, 09:31:17 PM
Thank you so much for these simple yet clearer explanations.
15  Joe Carillo's Desk / You Asked Me This Question / Writing a resume or curriculum vitae on: July 10, 2014, 06:44:16 PM
Sir,
 What do we have to consider in writing a resume? Is it different from curriculum vitae? Thank you.
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